Mainstream Media Has Got To Go

image source: William DeBurgh

image source: William DeBurgh

The lies and propaganda coming out of mainstream media and news outlets funded by guys like George Soros and his ilk have become just too much to bear.

It’s sickening and frankly a little overwhelming so I do my best to ignore it by listening to podcasts of my choosing–like Jason Stapleton and Tom Woods and other positive idea leaders.

Those podcasts have replaced my mainstream media outlets entirely.

But we could use many more like Jason and Tom.

Also, those two in particular tend more toward commentary on recent events; and education in fundamental ideas related to personal liberty and economics, rather than breaking actual news themselves. It’s just not their thing.

There is still a massive gap in the “real news”department–and by news I’m referring to actual investigative journalism.

I’m talking about seasoned investigative vets who go for the throat to get at the truth–the kind of truth that leads to doing something to improve a situation, not just overwhelm everyone with how terrifying the world is–while at the same time participating (knowingly or unknowingly) in what are essentially false flag events to “prove it”.

This is about a people-only supported team of ace reporters, working for people like you and me, not the Kochs or Soroses of the world, or some corporation with an agenda.

If this tickles your fancy, how about we all do something about it?

Here’s a kickstarter campaign for a new people-funded news organization called Newsbud, founded by FBI whistleblower Sibel Edmonds (some other posts in the group here–she was just on Tom Woods…GREAT interview).

I also recommend listening to her interview with Tom Woods.It’s abut 40 mins but in the last 15 or so she hits on this project.

(But do yourself a favor and listen to that whole Tom Woods interview over some beverage of your choosing. It’s a real breath of fresh air in the news department and will give you a taste of the kinds of things on which she and her Newsbud team would report. Frankly, it will likely blow your mind when you hear about the CIA funded guy who runs the largest charter school in the USA.)

This is what mainstream media should be about.

Let’s help make it a reality.

=> Go here to help now

 

Nextdoor App Could Learn From Waze

GangtsaThere is this really great app and website called Nextdoor (www.nextdoor.com).

It brings members of a neighborhood together by operating as a nexus point for their intra-‘hood communication, if you will.

The Nextdoor app is far more effective than Facebook Groups because its structure is more closely aligned to the function of a typical neighborhood.

For example, a primary function of any neighborhood is to remain or become safe for its inhabitants.

One way that is accomplished is by being more alert to what’s going on.

Nextdoor enhances this basic function by providing a way to raise awareness very quickly that something is happening in the area.

Nextdoor App Message screen

Nextdoor’s New Post Window

If one sees a suspicious character, it’s simply a few linese of text into the app (or website), mark it as an urgent alert and every other member gets a text message to their phone.

Awareness raised!

I’ve been playing around with it a lot lately, though, and feel they could do even more to make it easier to post such alerts.

I envision and improvement to be a sort of marriage of function between what Nextdoor does and what the popular crowdsourcing GPS app Waze can allow you to do.

With Waze, when you’re driving along and see a speedtrap, your phone already knows where you are. So that part of the alert or incident is already known.

From there you’re two taps/clicks away from saying what it is you’re recording (in this case, a speed trap–see image below).

Suspicious activity

Waze GPS App – Report Window

Back to our neighborhood issues, Nextdoor could benefit from this same sort of user interface enhancement.

Today I was riding my bike to my office a few blocks away from my house (I know, horrible commute).

Still in my neighborhood, I spotted a pretty suspicious looking fellow walking down one of the main residential roads. I know for a fact he doesn’t live in our subdivision. But he was just walking somewhere and I didn’t see enough to bother  the cops with it at that point.

The question is, where is he going? Just passing through or is he just practiced at looking more harmless than the other ganster types and really on his way to sneak into someone’s back door?

This is a perfect use case for Nextdoor.

Only thing is, I’m I’m going somewhere, too–and I’m riding my bike.

So now I have to stop, get off my bike and text/dictate an update to Nextdoor?

Instead, why not make it so that all I have to do is open the app and instantly touch an icon that represents the location of a “Suspicious character”?

A follow-up option could offer me to input the person’s general direction or that they are stationary, which would help neighborhood eyeballs estimate which way to point.

Done!

Others in the area get an update (which could now be very specifically alerted based on their home’s location) and I’m on my way.

I wouldn’t even need to get off my bike.

Often you just want more of the aforementioned eyeballs on the scene–to let people know maybe they should pause from their favorite program or website and take a peek out the window.

Waze does this sort of data collection extremely well. No doubt that helped a lot in making the app easy to use which, in turn, increased the demand and value of the application (rumored to have sold to Google for $1.1 billion recently).

It goes along with the old adage “if you want people to do something, make it easy for them…”

Nextdoor is well on their way to making it easier for neighbors to help neighbors but, in my opinion, they could make Urgent Alerts much easier.